iJordan Tours - Jordan Sites

Jordan Sites

Amman (Ammon Capital of Jordan)

Amman (Ammon Capital of Jordan)

Amman (Ammon Capital of Jordan)

Was built on seven hills (in Arabic Tilal تلال) defining Amman’s uniquely versatile neighborhoods. Amman is a unique city of fascinating contrasts with multicultural, well-educated very hospitable people. A mixture of old and new, Amman holds almost half of Jordan’s population.

Ammanies – as well as visitors of Amman – enjoy the warmth and welcoming spirit of this grand city. You could pay a visit to many interesting sites in the capital such as the Citadel, Jabal Al Qal’a, Hercules Temple (AKA Great Temple of Amman), the Roman Theatre, the Jordan Folklore Museum, the Jordan Archeological Museum, the Museum of Popular Traditions, the King Abdullah Mosque and the famous old souks (traditional markets أسواق) in the downtown area (Al Balad البلد) in Amman.

Was built on seven hills (in Arabic Tilal تلال) defining Amman’s uniquely versatile neighborhoods. Amman is a unique city of fascinating contrasts with multicultural, well-educated very hospitable people. A mixture of old and new, Amman holds almost half of Jordan’s population.

Ammanies – as well as visitors of Amman – enjoy the warmth and welcoming spirit of this grand city. You could pay a visit to many interesting sites in the capital such as the Citadel, Jabal Al Qal’a, Hercules Temple (AKA Great Temple of Amman), the Roman Theatre, the Jordan Folklore Museum, the Jordan Archeological Museum, the Museum of Popular Traditions, the King Abdullah Mosque and the famous old souks (traditional markets أسواق) in the downtown area (Al Balad البلد) in Amman.

Petra (Red Rose City)

Petra (Red Rose City)

Petra (Red Rose City)

Also known as the Red-rose city of Petra, this Nabatean work of art is situated between the Red Sea and the Dead Sea. An entire city half-carved into humongous mountains, Petra became during Hellenistic and Roman times a major caravan centre for the incense of Arabia, the silks of China and the spices of India, a crossroads between Arabia, Egypt and Syria-Phoenicia. Petra is surrounded by mountains riddled with passages and gorges with an ingenious water management system that allowed extensive settlement of an essentially arid area during the Nabatean, Roman and Byzantine periods. It is one of the world’s richest and largest archaeological sites set in a dominating red-rose sandstone landscape.

Visitors of Petra, dedicate a minimum of 2-3 days to fully explore the outstanding site. The value of Petra resides in the vast extent of sophisticated tomb and temple architecture; religious high places; the remnant channels, tunnels and diversion dams that combined with a vast network of cisterns and reservoirs. The fusion of Hellenistic architectural facades with traditional Nabatean rock-cut temple/tombs including the Khaznah, the Urn Tomb, the Palace Tomb, the Corinthian Tomb and the Deir “the Monastery” represents a unique artistic achievement and an outstanding architectural ensemble of the first centuries BC to AD. The varied archaeological remains and architectural monuments from prehistoric times to the medieval periods bear exceptional testimony to the now lost civilizations which succeeded each other at the site.

Also known as the Red-rose city of Petra, this Nabatean work of art is situated between the Red Sea and the Dead Sea. An entire city half-carved into humongous mountains, Petra became during Hellenistic and Roman times a major caravan centre for the incense of Arabia, the silks of China and the spices of India, a crossroads between Arabia, Egypt and Syria-Phoenicia. Petra is surrounded by mountains riddled with passages and gorges with an ingenious water management system that allowed extensive settlement of an essentially arid area during the Nabatean, Roman and Byzantine periods. It is one of the world’s richest and largest archaeological sites set in a dominating red-rose sandstone landscape.

Visitors of Petra, dedicate a minimum of 2-3 days to fully explore the outstanding site. The value of Petra resides in the vast extent of sophisticated tomb and temple architecture; religious high places; the remnant channels, tunnels and diversion dams that combined with a vast network of cisterns and reservoirs. The fusion of Hellenistic architectural facades with traditional Nabatean rock-cut temple/tombs including the Khaznah, the Urn Tomb, the Palace Tomb, the Corinthian Tomb and the Deir “the Monastery” represents a unique artistic achievement and an outstanding architectural ensemble of the first centuries BC to AD. The varied archaeological remains and architectural monuments from prehistoric times to the medieval periods bear exceptional testimony to the now lost civilizations which succeeded each other at the site.

Jerash

Jerash

Jerash

Jerash is one the best preserved ancient Roman provincial cities in the world. Just about a 30-minute drive from the capital city of Jordan; Amman (approximately 48 KM), is a mixture of Greco-Roman and ancient Arab traditions and therefore careful preservation and planning has developed this city from the ruins so there is no encroachment on the sites.

Visitors enter the site through Hadrian’s Arch, built in honor of its namesake. Close by is the Hippodrome where chariot races and sporting events were held. Walk up a colonnade of 1st century columns in the Oval Plaza and then take the staircase that leads you to the Temple of Zeus; surrounded by15 meters high Corinthian columns.

To the right of the Oval Plaza is the onsite Archaeological Museum with fascinating artifacts found on the site including gold jewelry, coins, glass and even pottery theater tickets. To the north of the Oval Plaza is the Cardo Maximus (the main road in Jerash), paved with its original stones and bears the ruts of chariot wheels.

These are some of the many interesting explorations in Jerash: the Marketplace, the Umayyad Mosque, South Tetrapylon, South Decumanus, Temple of Dionyus which was rebuilt as a Byzantine Church, the Shrine of the Virgin Mary, the Church of St. Theodore, the Church of St. Cosmos and St. Damian, the Church of St john the Baptist, the Church of St George, the Nymphaeum, the Propylaeum, the Temple of Artemis, the Odeon (a small theater), the Church of the Bishop Isaiah, and the North Tetrapylon.

Jerash hosts the lively annual Jerash Festival, held for 2 weeks in July with local, regional performing artists in addition to international artists.

Jerash is one the best preserved ancient Roman provincial cities in the world. Just about a 30-minute drive from the capital city of Jordan; Amman (approximately 48 KM), is a mixture of Greco-Roman and ancient Arab traditions and therefore careful preservation and planning has developed this city from the ruins so there is no encroachment on the sites.

Visitors enter the site through Hadrian’s Arch, built in honor of its namesake. Close by is the Hippodrome where chariot races and sporting events were held. Walk up a colonnade of 1st century columns in the Oval Plaza and then take the staircase that leads you to the Temple of Zeus; surrounded by15 meters high Corinthian columns.

To the right of the Oval Plaza is the onsite Archaeological Museum with fascinating artifacts found on the site including gold jewelry, coins, glass and even pottery theater tickets. To the north of the Oval Plaza is the Cardo Maximus (the main road in Jerash), paved with its original stones and bears the ruts of chariot wheels.

These are some of the many interesting explorations in Jerash: the Marketplace, the Umayyad Mosque, South Tetrapylon, South Decumanus, Temple of Dionyus which was rebuilt as a Byzantine Church, the Shrine of the Virgin Mary, the Church of St. Theodore, the Church of St. Cosmos and St. Damian, the Church of St john the Baptist, the Church of St George, the Nymphaeum, the Propylaeum, the Temple of Artemis, the Odeon (a small theater), the Church of the Bishop Isaiah, and the North Tetrapylon.

Jerash hosts the lively annual Jerash Festival, held for 2 weeks in July with local, regional performing artists in addition to international artists.

Madaba

Madaba

Madaba

Madaba is about 30 KM from Amman is best known as the City of Mosaics; thanks to the spectacular Byzantine and Umayyad mosaic art. Madaba is the home of the famous 6th century Mosaic Map of Jerusalem and the Holy Land. With two million pieces of vividly colored local stones depicting hills and valleys, villages and towns as far as the Nile Delta.

The Madaba Mosaic Map covers the floor of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. George, which is located northwest of the city centre. The church was built in 1896 AD, over the remains of a much earlier 6th century Byzantine church. The mosaic panel enclosing the Map was originally around 15.6 X 6m, 94 sqm.

Also in Madaba you can find the Archaeological Park & Museum showcasing the remains of several Byzantine churches – including the mosaics of the Church of the Virgin and the Hyppolytus Hall.

Close to the Church of the Virgin is the Madaba Institute for Mosaic Art and Restoration, which operates under the patronage of the Ministry of Tourism. The only project of its kind in the Middle East, the institute trains artisans in the art of making, repairing and restoring mosaics.

Madaba is about 30 KM from Amman is best known as the City of Mosaics; thanks to the spectacular Byzantine and Umayyad mosaic art. Madaba is the home of the famous 6th century Mosaic Map of Jerusalem and the Holy Land. With two million pieces of vividly colored local stones depicting hills and valleys, villages and towns as far as the Nile Delta.

The Madaba Mosaic Map covers the floor of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. George, which is located northwest of the city centre. The church was built in 1896 AD, over the remains of a much earlier 6th century Byzantine church. The mosaic panel enclosing the Map was originally around 15.6 X 6m, 94 sqm.

Also in Madaba you can find the Archaeological Park & Museum showcasing the remains of several Byzantine churches – including the mosaics of the Church of the Virgin and the Hyppolytus Hall.

Close to the Church of the Virgin is the Madaba Institute for Mosaic Art and Restoration, which operates under the patronage of the Ministry of Tourism. The only project of its kind in the Middle East, the institute trains artisans in the art of making, repairing and restoring mosaics.

Mt. Nebo

Mt. Nebo

Mt. Nebo

Mount Nebo is one of the most important Christian holy sites in Jordan. This is where – according to the final chapter of Deuteronomy – the Hebrew Prophet Moses viewed the Promised Land for the first time. If you stand on the viewing platform erected for Pope John Paul II you can enjoy the panoramic scene that Moses saw more than 3000 years ago.

Mount Nebo’s first church was constructed in the 2nd half of the 4th century to commemorate the place of Moses’ death. It had three apses and was preceded by a vestibule paved with plain white mosaic; two funeral chapels stood to the north and south of the lateral apses.

The Serpentine Cross sculpture (the Brazen Serpent Monument) atop Mount Nebo was created by the Italian artist, Giovanni Fantoni. It is symbolic of the bronze serpent created by Moses in the wilderness (Numbers 21:4-9) and the cross upon which Jesus was crucified (John 3:14).

Six tombs have been found hollowed from the natural rock beneath the mosaic-covered floor of the church. In the present presbytery you can see remnants of mosaic floors from different periods. The earliest of these is a panel with a braided cross presently placed on the east end of the south wall.

On March 19, 2000, Pope John Paul II visited the site during his pilgrimage to the Holy Land (Mount Nebo being one of the most important Christian sites in Jordan). During his visit he planted an olive tree beside the Byzantine chapel as a symbol of peace.

Mount Nebo is one of the most important Christian holy sites in Jordan. This is where – according to the final chapter of Deuteronomy – the Hebrew Prophet Moses viewed the Promised Land for the first time. If you stand on the viewing platform erected for Pope John Paul II you can enjoy the panoramic scene that Moses saw more than 3000 years ago.

Mount Nebo’s first church was constructed in the 2nd half of the 4th century to commemorate the place of Moses’ death. It had three apses and was preceded by a vestibule paved with plain white mosaic; two funeral chapels stood to the north and south of the lateral apses.

The Serpentine Cross sculpture (the Brazen Serpent Monument) atop Mount Nebo was created by the Italian artist, Giovanni Fantoni. It is symbolic of the bronze serpent created by Moses in the wilderness (Numbers 21:4-9) and the cross upon which Jesus was crucified (John 3:14).

Six tombs have been found hollowed from the natural rock beneath the mosaic-covered floor of the church. In the present presbytery you can see remnants of mosaic floors from different periods. The earliest of these is a panel with a braided cross presently placed on the east end of the south wall.

On March 19, 2000, Pope John Paul II visited the site during his pilgrimage to the Holy Land (Mount Nebo being one of the most important Christian sites in Jordan). During his visit he planted an olive tree beside the Byzantine chapel as a symbol of peace.

Bethany

Bethany

Bethany

Bethany is the site of the baptism site of Jesus Christ by John over 2000 years ago. Known in Arabic as Al-Maghtas, the ‘Baptism Site’ has been identified by archaeologists as the place where John the Baptist preached that this is the site where the first five apostles met and thus where the foundations of the early Christian faith were laid. Jesus is said to have come here to meet en route from Galilee and Um Qais and is believed to have spent three days here before heading off to spend 40 days in the nearby wilderness. John was later arrested and beheaded by Herod at Machaerus, also in Jordan.

The site is about a 45-minute drive from Amman and it is believed that this is the site where Jesus Christ was baptized by John the Baptist. Bethany, as mentioned in the book of John, is also known by other names. It is called Beth-Abara or Bethabara (Beit el-‘Obour in Arabic) meaning ‘house of the crossing’, referring to the Joshua and Elijah crossings of the river, and Arabic Bible translations call it Beit ‘Anya.

Beyond its religious significance the site has a fine location, with views of the Dead Sea, Mt. Nebo, Jericho (12 KM away), Jerusalem (27 KM) and the Jordan River.

Bethany is the site of the baptism site of Jesus Christ by John over 2000 years ago. Known in Arabic as Al-Maghtas, the ‘Baptism Site’ has been identified by archaeologists as the place where John the Baptist preached that this is the site where the first five apostles met and thus where the foundations of the early Christian faith were laid. Jesus is said to have come here to meet en route from Galilee and Um Qais and is believed to have spent three days here before heading off to spend 40 days in the nearby wilderness. John was later arrested and beheaded by Herod at Machaerus, also in Jordan.

The site is about a 45-minute drive from Amman and it is believed that this is the site where Jesus Christ was baptized by John the Baptist. Bethany, as mentioned in the book of John, is also known by other names. It is called Beth-Abara or Bethabara (Beit el-‘Obour in Arabic) meaning ‘house of the crossing’, referring to the Joshua and Elijah crossings of the river, and Arabic Bible translations call it Beit ‘Anya.

Beyond its religious significance the site has a fine location, with views of the Dead Sea, Mt. Nebo, Jericho (12 KM away), Jerusalem (27 KM) and the Jordan River.

Dead Sea

Dead Sea

Dead Sea

Over 400m (1,312 ft.) below sea level where you could float effortlessly and read a book while you are at it! The Dead Sea is located in the Jordan Valley; a one of a kind place as it is the lowest point on the face of the earth.

Best known as a natural spa, the Dead Sea is a retreat even during wintertime due the warm, soothing, super salty water itself – some ten times saltier than sea water, and rich in chloride salts of magnesium, sodium, potassium, bromine and several others. The Dead Sea’s rich, black, stimulating mud is a therapeutical natural treasure. The Dead Sea has evolved into a major hub of both religious and health & wellness tourism in the region.

Over 400m (1,312 ft.) below sea level where you could float effortlessly and read a book while you are at it! The Dead Sea is located in the Jordan Valley; a one of a kind place as it is the lowest point on the face of the earth.

Best known as a natural spa, the Dead Sea is a retreat even during wintertime due the warm, soothing, super salty water itself – some ten times saltier than sea water, and rich in chloride salts of magnesium, sodium, potassium, bromine and several others. The Dead Sea’s rich, black, stimulating mud is a therapeutical natural treasure. The Dead Sea has evolved into a major hub of both religious and health & wellness tourism in the region.

Feynan

Feynan

Feynan

Feynan Valley is located in the deep heart of the mountainous Dana Reserve. Isolated from paved roads, electricity supplies and cell phone network coverage, it is an escape and a unique experience in the Jordanian desert. Feynan Eco-lodge hailed as one of the top fifty eco-lodges in the world by the National Geographic Magazine.

In Feynan, you will explore local archaeological sites, sip tea with native Bedouins, or simply unwind in this one of a kind serene and environmentally-friendly setting.

Feynan Valley is located in the deep heart of the mountainous Dana Reserve. Isolated from paved roads, electricity supplies and cell phone network coverage, it is an escape and a unique experience in the Jordanian desert. Feynan Eco-lodge hailed as one of the top fifty eco-lodges in the world by the National Geographic Magazine.

In Feynan, you will explore local archaeological sites, sip tea with native Bedouins, or simply unwind in this one of a kind serene and environmentally-friendly setting.

Wadi Rum(Valley of the Moon)

Wadi Rum(Valley of the Moon)

Wadi Rum(Valley of the Moon)

Wadi Rum is one of the most extraordinary sceneries in Jordan. It is a protected area covering 720 square kilometers of dramatic desert wilderness in the south of Jordan. Huge mountains of sandstone and granite emerge, sheer-sided, from wide sandy valleys to reach heights of 1700 meters and more. Narrow canyons and fissures cut deep into the mountains and many conceal ancient rock drawings etched by the peoples of the desert over millennia. Bedouin tribes still live among the mountains of Rum and their large goat-hair tents are a special feature of the landscape.

In Wadi Rum, you will enjoy the serenity of the place as you escape your daily worries and become one with nature! If you are feeling a little adventurous, you could go mountain climbing, skydiving, or even take a sunrise hot-air balloon ride. It definitely is an experience for all ages and a highlight of your trip.

This area, made famous abroad by the exploits of TE Lawrence (‘Lawrence of Arabia’) in the early 20th century, has lost none of its allure and forbidding majesty. Its myriad moods and dramatic colors, dictated by the changing angle of the sun, best reward an overnight trip so, unless you’re really pushed for time, linger here for a day or two, slowing down to the timeless rhythm of desert life, enjoying the galaxy of stars overhead at night and the spectacular sunrises and sunsets. Like most deserts, Wadi Rum is as much to be experienced as it is to be seen

Wadi Rum is one of the most extraordinary sceneries in Jordan. It is a protected area covering 720 square kilometers of dramatic desert wilderness in the south of Jordan. Huge mountains of sandstone and granite emerge, sheer-sided, from wide sandy valleys to reach heights of 1700 meters and more. Narrow canyons and fissures cut deep into the mountains and many conceal ancient rock drawings etched by the peoples of the desert over millennia. Bedouin tribes still live among the mountains of Rum and their large goat-hair tents are a special feature of the landscape.

In Wadi Rum, you will enjoy the serenity of the place as you escape your daily worries and become one with nature! If you are feeling a little adventurous, you could go mountain climbing, skydiving, or even take a sunrise hot-air balloon ride. It definitely is an experience for all ages and a highlight of your trip.

This area, made famous abroad by the exploits of TE Lawrence (‘Lawrence of Arabia’) in the early 20th century, has lost none of its allure and forbidding majesty. Its myriad moods and dramatic colors, dictated by the changing angle of the sun, best reward an overnight trip so, unless you’re really pushed for time, linger here for a day or two, slowing down to the timeless rhythm of desert life, enjoying the galaxy of stars overhead at night and the spectacular sunrises and sunsets. Like most deserts, Wadi Rum is as much to be experienced as it is to be seen

Aqaba

Aqaba

Aqaba

Aqaba is the sole coastal city in Jordan and it is situated at the northeastern tip of the Red Sea. Aqaba is a blend of cultures and traditions, and a long history as the trading center in the region!

It is a melting pot of history, culture, nature, and city life surrounded by picturesque mountains and blue sea. It is one of the major tourist attractions in Jordan, and popular especially amongst divers and water sports enthusiasts for its all year-round warm water and rich coral reefs.

Aqaba is the sole coastal city in Jordan and it is situated at the northeastern tip of the Red Sea. Aqaba is a blend of cultures and traditions, and a long history as the trading center in the region!

It is a melting pot of history, culture, nature, and city life surrounded by picturesque mountains and blue sea. It is one of the major tourist attractions in Jordan, and popular especially amongst divers and water sports enthusiasts for its all year-round warm water and rich coral reefs.